Niue Islands 2014 $5 Carlo Crivelli Icon St. George Gold Gilded 2 Oz Silver Coin

SPECIAL FEATURES:

  • Mintage Limit - 999
  • icon St. George and Dragon HighRelief 1oz Silver Coin
  • Coin with convex shape
  • High Relief
  • Coin in capsule+with Certificate of Authenticity+Presentation Case

$217.00
Size chart
Women's clothing size
SizeXSSML
Euro 32/34 36 38 40
USA 0/2 4 6 8
Bust(in) 31-32 33 34 36
Bust(cm) 80.5-82.5 84.5 87 92
Waist(in) 24-25 26 27 29
Waist(cm) 62.5-64.5 66.5 69 74
Hips(in) 34-35 36 37 39
Hips(cm) 87.5-89.5 91.5 94 99
How To Measure Your Bust

With your arms relaxed at your sides, measure around the fullest part of your chest.

How To Measure Your Waist

Measure around the narrowest part of your natural waist, generally around the belly button. To ensure a comfortable fit, keep one finger between the measuring tape and your body.

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Description
  • Mintage Limit - 999
  • icon St. George and Dragon HighRelief 1oz Silver Coin
  • Coin with convex shape
  • High Relief
  • Coin in capsule+with Certificate of Authenticity+Presentation Case
  • Each coin has own unique number on the edge, that match with COA number

Saint George (Greek: Γε?ργιος (Georgios), Latin: Georgius; c. 275/281 – 23 April 303 AD), born in Lydda in what is now Israel, was a soldier in the Roman army and was later venerated as a Christian martyr. His father was Gerontius, an important official in the Roman army. Saint George became an officer in the Roman army in the Guard of Diocletian. In hagiography, Saint George is one of the most venerated saints in the Catholic (Western and Eastern Rites), Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, and the Oriental Orthodox churches. He is immortalized in the tale of Saint George and the Dragon and is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. His memorial is celebrated on 23 April, and he is regarded as one of the most prominent military saints.

Many Patronages of Saint George exist around the world, including: Georgia, England, Egypt, Bulgaria, Aragon, Catalonia, Romania, Ethiopia, Greece, India, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, Serbia, Ukraine and Russia, as well as the cities of Genoa, Amersfoort, Beirut, Botosani, Drobeta Turnu-Severin, Timisoara, Fakiha, Bteghrine, Cáceres, Ferrara, Freiburg im Breisgau, Kragujevac, Kumanovo, Ljubljana, Pérouges, Pomorie, Preston, Qormi, Rio de Janeiro, Lod, Lviv, Barcelona, Moscow and Victoria, as well as of the Scout Movementand a wide range of professions, organizations and disease sufferers.

Eastern Orthodox depictions of Saint George slaying a dragon often include the image of the young maiden who looks on from a distance. The standard iconographic interpretation of the image icon is that the dragon represents both Satan (Rev. 12:9) and the monster from his life story. The young maiden is the wife of Diocletian, Alexandra. Thus the image, as interpreted through the language of Byzantine iconography, is an image of the martyrdom of the saint.[citation needed]

The episode of St. George and the Dragon was a legendbrought back with the Crusaders and retold with the courtly appurtenances belonging to the genre of Romance. The earliest known depiction of the legend is from early eleventh-century Cappadocia (in the iconography of the Eastern Orthodox Church, George had been depicted as a soldier since at least the seventh century); the earliest known surviving narrative text is an eleventh-century Georgian text.
White George on the coat of arms of Georgia.

In the fully developed Western version, which developed as part of the Golden Legend, a dragon or crocodile makes its nest at the spring that provides water for the city of "Silene" (perhaps modern Cyrene in Libya or the city of Lydda in the Holy Land, depending on the source). Consequently, the citizens have to dislodge the dragon from its nest for a time, to collect water. To do so, each day they offer the dragon at first a sheep, and if no sheep can be found, then a maiden is the best substitute for one. The victim is chosen by drawing lots. One day, this happens to be the princess. The monarch begs for her life to be spared, but to no avail. She is offered to the dragon, but then Saint George appears on his travels. He faces the dragon, protects himself with the sign of the Cross, slays the dragon, and rescues the princess. The citizens abandon their ancestral paganism and convert to Christianity.

The dragon motif was first combined with the standardised Passio Georgii in Vincent of Beauvais' encyclopaedic Speculum Historiale and then in Jacobus de Voragine's "Golden Legend", which guaranteed its popularity in the later Middle Ages as a literary and pictorial subject.

The parallels with Perseus, Cetus and Andromeda are inescapable. In the allegorical reading, the dragon embodies a suppressed pagan cult. The story has other roots that predate Christianity. Examples such as Sabazios, the sky father, who was usually depicted riding on horseback, and Zeus's defeat of Typhon the Titan in Greek mythology, along with examples from Germanic and Vedic traditions, have led a number of historians, such as Loomis, to suggest that George is a Christianized version of older deities in Indo-European culture, or at least a suitably Christian substitute for one of them.

In the medieval romances, the lance with which St George slew the dragon was called Ascalon, named after the city of Ashkelon in the Levant.

Product Details

Data sheet

Year:
2014
Face Value:
5 Dollars
Metal:
Silver
Fineness:
999/1000
Weight
2oz - 62.2g
Size (mm):
27 x 77
Mintage:
999
Quality:
Proof
Certificate COA:
Yes
Presentation Case:
Yes
Country:
Niue Islands
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